Glovo offers employability training to riders

As an investment in its workforce, quick-delivery giant Glovo has launched a set of online courses for its gig economy riders to improve their employability.

The idea for the online courses comes from surveys of Glovo’s riders across its 25 markets, many of whom said that learning and training would help them in their careers.

The course is being developed with Goodhabitz and is on a learning platform set up by Foxize. The G-Learning platform now offers more than 110 courses in six European languages, and this will be available to all of its riders by the middle of the coming year.

Glovo signed The Couriers Pledge earlier this year and training is one of the pillars of the pledge, which aims to improve the social rights and benefits for those working in the industry, regardless of their work status with the firm. It has rolled out the pledge in three markets – Morocco, Poland and Georgia – and aims to have this open to all its riders by the end of 2023.

Sacha Michaud, Glovo Co-founder at Glovo, said: “The gig economy has been a great source of income and flexibility for many, but it is not without its challenges. Through our development and implementation of The Couriers Pledge, we’ve been able to provide more social rights to our couriers, by improving insurance coverage, setting fair hourly earnings and providing access to safety and maintenance provisions. But we will not stop there. G-Learning was launched from the demand for training and educational courses, giving our couriers the opportunity to pursue longer-term career plans.

“We not only want to positively impact the couriers which work with Glovo, but we want to set new industry standards for a fairer gig economy overall and ensure the topic of platform workers’ rights is at the top of the agenda. Our aim is to work with local governments and communities to ensure that couriers have access to the training and learning they deserve to better their careers.”

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